SUPERFOODS AND SUPERFOOD RECIPES FOR YOUR CHILDREN AND YOU

SUPERFOODS AND SUPERFOOD RECIPES FOR YOUR CHILDREN AND YOU

Notice how the title made you make a beeline towards this article?

You owe this attraction to the growing claims about ‘immunity-boosting food’, ‘superfoods’ and the like. 

Living in the time we do, it is understandable to be worried about your family’s well-being, even more so if you’re the parent to a young one. 

But with all the stirring buzz about superfoods, you find yourself in a conundrum: to believe, or not to believe?

To deliver you from your (known or unknown) confusions, here is a shocking (for some) revelation about your favourite superfoods and what you can do instead of fuelling their reign:

How super is a superfood?

The term superfood is no novelty for any of us. But did you know that it is a relatively recent phenomenon? 

The term was coined in the early 1900s as a marketing gimmick to push the sales of bananas, the world’s first ‘superfood’. Trade groups funded research to back a major import of bananas. 

Many researchers and experts since have said that no such thing as a superfood exists. Putting all your faith (and money) in buying a certain food item as an end-all remedy is against science and, pardon the pertinence, beyond common sense.

Facts or Fiction?

Likewise, many food myths have cropped up since to boost sales of various food products. Such a deluge of misinformation is enough to make one doubt the claims on food labels and those made by trade-group funded research.

Let’s uncover some such myths and see what’s factual and what’s fictitious in the wide world of nutrition and immunity (which is a buzzword of its own in these times of health-ambiguity):

Claim 1- The more immune-boosting foods you consume, the healthier your immune system gets, and the better equipped it is to keep away diseases.

FICTION- Let’s begin by reiterating the age-old saying: too much of anything is harmful. And nothing rings true to this ancient piece of wisdom. 

It is a less-known fact that an overactive immune system (yes it’s possible to have one) is linked to diseases like lupus, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. It also causes the flaring up of allergic reactions.

Having a hyperactive immune system leads to its reacting against run-of-the-mill substances in and around your body.

ADVICE- Having a hyperactive immune system as you’ve seen, isn’t ideal. What’s required is an optimal immune system which does its job just enough to keep infections and pathogens at bay. 

It does not mean that you will not fall sick. A healthy immune system means having fevers and a runny nose at times, which is necessary to expel irritants from your nose and to kill germs that invade your body by raising its core temperature.

Claim 2: Taking supplements of immunity-boosting nutrients is healthier (or) supplements are mandatory to fulfil your daily nutritional requirements

FICTION- It has become a general belief that supplements are indispensable to have good health and to fulfil daily nutritional requirements. But this is a myth too.

ADVICE- A balanced diet provides the right nutrients in the right amount. Supplements are only required by those who follow vegetarian or vegan diets, or by persons suffering from nutrient deficiencies caused by a lack of particular nutrients in their diet.

Taking supplements is not necessary if you have good food habits. They can often do more harm than good if taken without prescriptions.

Moreover, taking too much of a nutrient or vitamin can also be problematic. Once again, practise moderation and do not DIY in matters as such.

Claim 3: Exotic foods claimed to be superfoods are better than local fruits and seasonal vegetables as they are more nutrient-dense

FICTION- Yes folks, it’s true this also a false fact shoved down our throats to boost sales of certain imported (and expensive) food items. It is not necessary that you consume chia seeds or cranberries because they have a higher concentration of a certain nutrient you want. 

ADVICE- Locally grown fruits and veg, preferably seasonal are more beneficial for the body than any imported or exotic food. This is because the food sourced from local regions has adapted to its current form after thousands of years of evolving in the region. It provides a better combination of nutrients than exotic food, depending on the season. 

Moreover, it provides a boost to the local economy and is not pricey, owing to the lack of import duty. So, instead of a cherry, eat an Indian gooseberry (or amla) when you need a boost of Vitamin C next time.

Claim 4: Instead of having a range of healthy food, one can have a few nutrient-dense foods instead

FICTION- This is what marketers and superfood PR strategists want you to believe. The truth remains that nothing is better than having a balanced diet, and eating a selective diet can lead your body to over-consumption of particular nutrients, which is counter-productive.

ADVICE- Your body requires an array of nutrients and ideally from varied sources. Not eating a balanced diet is an invitation to infections and diseases as every nutrient has its role in maintaining bodily functions going smooth and co-ordinated. 

So, the takeaway here is that you need a balanced diet, lest your bodily functions get impaired, and you become prone to diseases.

Claim 5- Certain foods act as medicine

FICTION- The fact still remains. Every nutrient present in food plays a role in maintaining a body-function. No particular food item or nutrient can ‘cure’ your ailment.

ADVICE- The easiest way to say this has been already covered: a balanced diet. Eat a varied diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and you can prevent diseases. The cure? Well, what’re the medical experts for?

EASY KID-FRIENDLY RECIPE OPTIONS FOR WINTER FESTIVITIES

As a bonus, we are offering you a few recipes for your kids and you.

They’re easy enough and made of winter-friendly ingredients.

1. Nuts and seeds Laddoos

Festivity Delights with some Laddoos made of Nuts and seeds. Happy Culinary Celebrations!

SERVING SUGGESTION- Ditch your store-bought, sugar-loaded laddoos for Nuts and seeds ladoos this Diwali. 

Made with pumpkin seeds, watermelon seeds and flax seeds and nuts like almonds, cashew and walnuts, it provides Omega-3 fats, minerals like magnesium and phosphorus and small amounts of protein.

Additionally, using jaggery and/or honey as a sweetener instead of sugar leads to a guilt-free gorge session!

2. Chatpata Bhel with Berries

Festivity Delights with some Chatpata Bhel & berries. Happy Culinary Celebrations!

SERVING SUGGESTION- Instead of namkeen, you can make bhel at home and add the goodness of berries (increasing the daily fruit intake of your family. Well, aren’t you the sneak!)

Just like an ordinary homemade bhel, you can add sprouted pulses and beans, sprouted or fermented millets and berries with a dash of lime juice on the top. Don’t forget to add berries like pomegranate seeds to give the sweet kick!

This makes for a healthier alternative to fried food, keeping you and your kids away from trans fats and polyunsaturated fats. Also, it is wonderfully easy to make and not to mention, delicious!

3. Leafy Vegetables

Festivity Delights with some leafy greens- Palak paneer. Happy Culinary Celebrations!

SERVING SUGGESTION- For dinner, you can easily whip up some Palak Paneer, or a Punjabi classic, Sarso da Saag. You can also make kale crisps in the microwave or incorporate them in fried rice. If not, you can make a Palak-ki-daal and serve it with buttery naans. 

After all, winter is the time for indulgence too!

Remember to practise moderation and try not to turn your Diwali and Christmas celebrations into a fest of your nutrition anxieties. It is okay to binge on delicacies sometimes if you strike a balance.

You and your kids deserve a healthy life and its reinforcement begins at home. Inculcating these habits goes a long way in your child’s life, and although they make faces when you make them eat their veggies, you know they’ll thank you one day!

Don’t forget to fact-check marketing claims on your next grocery run. 
Be a responsible consumer, a mindful parent, and a happy person!
Happy Celebrations!

As a parting gift, here is a reading list you might want to go through:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthy-eating/what-can-you-do-to-improve-your-immune-system

https://www.advisory.com/daily-briefing/2018/10/26/superfood

https://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/features/boost-immune-system#2

https://factsforlife.org/05/2.html

https://www.advisory.com/daily-briefing/2017/11/20/blueberries-healthy

Fine Motor Skills Development

The creation of a child from a single cell is magical, and so is the development of the complex human brain. But what aids the development of the human brain is rather a series of simple activities. 

The brain controls and facilitates the functioning of the entire body stimuli. So the development of our brain can be seen as a coding process whereby our brain learns various skills over time. One set of such skills is termed as ‘Fine Motor Skills’. Fine motor skills involve fine coordination between small muscles in our hands, wrists, fingers, feet, and toes to act in accordance with what we see. ‘Hand-eye coordination’ is a type of fine motor skills.  

Following are the six integral aspects of Fine Motor Skills:

● Agility
● Balance
● Coordination
● Power
● Reaction Time 
● Speed 

As we have highlighted above, the development of children’s fine motor skills can be boosted by some simple activities which are all about a fun learning experience. So the next time your child is tempted towards screen-time, try involving them in some of these fun activities instead!

Activity 1 – The Pulse Puzzle

The activity might sound like a tongue-twister, but it can be a great pastime activity, that involves absolutely no cost. Pick two distinct coloured pulses, say, the split Bengal gram and green gram, and add in beans like red kidney beans or the white-eyed peas. Mix them together in a bowl and your activity is ready. Now encourage your child to segregate them and put them into different bowls. The activity not only involves the act of picking and holding but also improves the child’s recognition skills with respect to colours and textures, and might even encourage them to eat pulses. Start with two pulses and then you can make your way up from there. 

Activity 2 – Lego

Lego building blocks are children’s absolute favourite (and adults’ too, honestly!). Turning, placing, and flipping the pieces support the development of fine-motor skills. And they also promote creativity and imagination as every Lego play hour is an opportunity to build and talk about something new altogether!

Activity 3 – Craft Fun

Often parents fear giving scissors to their children concerning over the sharp-edges. But now there are a variety of child-safe scissors (safety scissors) available in the market that are kid-friendly. Cutting and pasting activities are a perfect setup to build hand-eye coordination and boost to creativity is a bonus! Also, colouring and painting are great activities too. 

Activity 4 – Threading Beads

Threading beads can be a great activity to promote visual motor-skills. And you can always play around colours and types of beads that encourage children to come up with newer patterns. Also, it enhances children’s detail to attention. You can step-up the activity and play with variations. One such variation can be showing a pattern of threaded beads of different colours and asking your child to replicate the same. Playing around such variations can keep the freshness of the activity intact and boost your child’s retention. 

Little activities like these go a long way and strengthen the foundation of our children’s development. Also, it is important to incorporate these activities as a fun learning experience and not like a to-do-list activity. Our children learn everything at their pace. The ‘right-age’ or the ‘right-pace’ is a myth. Don’t let any of these viral ideas ruin your experience of parenting. 

To read about my parenting experience with my child on his fine motor skills and when it consciously started, go to the link here.

I prefer encouraging what my child is genuinely interested in (mainly Lego brick building) along with free-printable activities I receive from ‘Growing Hands-On Kids’ website by Heather Greutman. 

Happy Parenting!

Thank you, dear Santa, for the Lego Bricks!

by Pallavi Prakash Kumar

Lego Classic Bricks set were Santa’s present for Pratham during Christmas celebrations in winters of 2018. I remember this day because I was intuitively guided to introduce a Lego kit to my child.

The blog is over!

I got to be kidding, right?

Yes! Of course, I am kidding…

The story of Pratham’s gift from Santa goes like this… C’mon, read on…

It was sometime in the month of July 2018, when Pratham and I were waiting outside the car parking at a South Delhi mall for my husband to bring around the car from the basement parking at the fourth level below the ground. It was going to take some time, and I knew it. After a few minutes of waiting, I started looking around at the shoppers passing by and began hearing some distinct voices along with thunderous clapping that was getting louder by the minute. A small thank you speech followed by the clatter of cups & plates. I so wanted to know what was happening and followed the direction where all these celebratory sounds were emerging from. I soon came upon a gathering where kids of ages three and above, escorted by their parents had begun dispersing in twos and threes, carrying a card and a goodie packet in their little hands. I asked one of the leaving parents keenly, what was the gathering all about? The lady answered, “This was a Lego robotics workshop for kids above 3+ years old.”

My guess was right; it was a ‘Parent & kids’ workshop as Parent’s day was round the corner. Pratham & I strolled a little closer to the celebration area. My eyes grew big and round seeing the large colourful rubber blocks, almost 6-7-inches long, sorted and kept arranged in different large boxes. On the table, set around the centre stage, were many medium & small-sized blocks, a few pullies and belt systems and few laptops. Also, stationed on the centre stage were some small to big Lego mats positioned on the interlocked colour mats. There were kids doing alphabet writing, some were busy colouring, some in the process of making objects of their choices – all fully engrossed. Some kids in groups were around the table, some playing over the mats, some others leaving with their parents and some reluctant to leave & being pulled by their parents. It was a beautiful sight to see so many genuinely interested and engrossed children in the making and learning. It was a pleasant and invigorating experience for me as a parent, “Alone the Lego sets keeping them engaged so sincerely. Wow!

Pratham wanted to go inside to play with big blocks, and he started wailing and pulling my hand to take him inside. Seeing this, a fair, golden brown-eyed lady standing by the entrance invited me inside. I immediately called my husband and requested him to wait a bit for us.

As I stepped inside, I realised that this was a path-breaking moment for me. I wanted to know more about the Lego robotics workshop. This opened me up to bombard the host with questions that were flooding my mind; I was excited.  I wasted no time in introducing ourselves my name, my son’s name, his age, his interests etc. Quick as a supercomputer, she registered our names and returned in a jiffy with exuberance “Hi Pallavi, Hi Pratham”. As soon as she smiled at Pratham, he rushed off to the play area, as if he just needed that invitation. My little one understands smiles well, approval signs. Now, I jumped asking my questions. At what age can we introduce Lego to the child, what is the age group required for robotics workshop, where & when does the classes happen, is there any Lego class for toddlers?

It was quite apparent looking at the large turnout of kids and parents that it was one of a kind and rare classes. She replied for the first time “My organization is called Zeki Jaan*, named after my father and I am a Turkish.” She further added with a broad smile, “Zeki means intelligent in Turkish and Jaan same as in Hindi means life, so it is intelligent life.” She also shared details about her decades of experience in Lego training, her aim to encourage critical and coding skills in children, STEM learning through Legos bricks and blocks with hands-on exercises. She added, “The classes are for toddlers, kids 4 -16 years old. Kids get to learn how to build simple machines using large pieces from an early age. Lego helps in fine motor skills development and spatial thinking.” Fine motor skills stood out to me as soon as she made that mention. She further explained “Introducing science concepts like balancing and gravity becomes easy, explaining physics concepts with models like gears and axles, wedges and screws, levers and pulleys becomes effortless too. We can also explain pattern matching, colour contrasts etc. through Lego-based activities.”

My phone rang before the conversation with the Turkish lady ‘Emine’ could come to any logical ending. It was my husband waiting at the exit gate. I had to leave. I could not wait for a second more. I quickly grabbed her business card as she handed one to me and left from the place with Pratham.

It was then that I first explored more about fine motor skills development in children. I usually prefer learning new subjects through books, so, I ordered the book ‘Basics of Fine Motor Skills’ by Heather Greutman**. I also learnt more about the bricks and blocks, their types and related activities for kids.

I had made up my mind after the conversations with Emine to gift Pratham his first Lego sets on his 3rd birthday, 10th December 2018. But somehow it skipped my mind in preparation for his birthday party. Later, when Pratham’s class teacher asked all the parents to send across a surprise Santa gift with the child’s name on it. It was then that I remembered buying Pratham his first Lego set. These gifts were supposed to be distributed respectively to the child by the Santa during Christmas celebrations hosted by the school.

I bought the set, gift-wrapped and labelled it with his name on the sticker and handed the gift box to the teacher. On 24th December, after the Christmas celebrations in the school, he came home happily, hopping and jumping, all excited and showing me his gift from Santa, it turned out to be a momentous day for both of us.

The ease of introducing him to new activities and new concepts with Lego is tremendous. An added advantage, my concerns over his increased screen time, and worrying about his overall development have reduced to a large extent.

A Santa bringing in a treasured memory and a gift for their child’s development, what more a mother could have asked for! All this happened automatically, at the right time, place and order. I had no knowledge of Lego or fine motor skills development up until that day. Had I not been there waiting for the car, had I not heard those mysterious clapping thunders, had I not followed my instincts? Lego sets and creative learning through bricks & blocks wouldn’t have taken its birth in my son’s life at the right time, and I wouldn’t have explored consciously about fine motor skills development which now is one of my favourite indulgences when choosing toys and activities for my little one.

This year we’ve enrolled him for structured bricks and blocks building programme.

* Facebook page link: https://www.facebook.com/zekijaan and website link: http://www.sproutingstems.in/

**Here‘s more about the book ‘Basics of Fine Motor Skills’ by Heather Greutman.

Effective Routine, Explore, and Experiment

‘The 3Es for the Higher Education Segment’

The need for the Higher Education segment to adapt to the changing world scenario due to the novel coronavirus is way greater than what we have discussed with regard to pre-schooling and primary schooling. This greater need arises from a relatively rigid and demanding curriculum and associated worry for quality grades, increased pressure to manage studies from home, adapting to the online mode of classes after years of experience with in-person learning at institutions. All this results in mental pressure, anxiety, lack of motivation, and decreased productivity.

If you are a student who can connect to these feelings or a parent reading whose child might be having a tough time adapting to the changing education environment, we want to take a moment to assure you this is normal and the way you are feeling is genuine, we are all together in this!

Unprecedented times bring unprecedented challenges, and that’s how innovation is born. Where the hard time is presenting us with challenges even with routine activities, it is also an opportunity to innovate and experiment. The core truth in this situation is that it’s going to take time, and uncertainty is going to prevail for the time being. But there are always some ways we can think of to make things easier for us to adapt and enrich the learning experience ‘at one’s own pace’, isn’t it?

Making the Routine Effective 

  • A good and consistent sleep routine, often ignored by older students, is the key to good health and ensures a better mental and productive state. A body that has had a restful night’s sleep is way more ready than a body that has pulled an all-nighter of binge-watching to take on the new day.  
  • Attention span issues are common with distractions around. And we would say, don’t say a strict no to distractions like social media, instead make time for them. If studying two hours on a stretch is posing to be a challenge, then instead try experimenting with smaller studying sessions. Try studying for 45 minutes after which you give yourself a 20 minutes’ break. You can use this break time to enjoy all that you want. But keep it to the ‘break-time’ only. Similarly, resist the desire to complete a Netflix show in a single-day and instead reward yourself with one episode a day, maybe with a meal or later towards the end of your workday. 
  • You can also try ‘focus music’ in the background with apps like Headspace while studying if it fits you. Try making a concise to-do-list (‘to-accomplish-list’, much better!) every day and start by taking small steps. After all, only those who are strong enough to take small steps when times are tough can brave enough to take the leap!
  • Build a habit! Personally, this is what I practice. Whenever I have a hard time keeping up with my routine or rituals, I try incorporating a new thing or a new activity to my routine or rituals. So now I have something to take along in parallel, and the likelihood of me managing both increases! Reading a book, a new form of workout, meditation, it could be anything.  
  • Take a day off! Being at home has also blurred the lines between weekdays and weekends. After a week of work, we all deserve one day off and indulge in some recreation or simply sit back and relax. Spend time with your family, get on a video call with your friends, play with your pet! 
  • Take it easy. We are often drawn to thoughts ‘no one will understand’ and resist sharing our problems and feelings. In case, if something is not working out for you, seek help, from your parents, your siblings, friends, teachers. And sometimes we don’t even need a solution, all we need to do to make things better is just talk it out with someone or free-write all the feelings or indulge in something we like doing, to allow the inspired actions to flow in. Don’t worry, it will all be fine!

Explore and Experiment 

This is a perfect time to explore your interest and delve deeper into various career opportunities as the market needs change after the global crisis.

Various global platforms are standing in support of students by providing free courses*. Even certifications and forms of vocation that might cost some amount are worth exploring as they add to the students’ learning curve and aid in realizing what they are drawn to, their ‘calling’. Webinars led by industry leaders and professors of reputed universities can broaden their perspective and give direction in their field of interest.

Also, if you are passionate about some form of art like music, dance, craft, writing, or any other sphere, now is the time to devote some. Incorporate them in your routine, dedicate some time and energy, learn more, and you can even consider sharing what you learn, which is easier than ever as the world functions online! Make a move! If it works, fabulous, and if it doesn’t, we can always keep learning and working! Whatever you will do in this phase, will add to your experience, and that’s the best thing one can gain.

And once again, a gentle reminder, we are all together in this, and it will all be fine!

*Links to a few online resources that might help and interest you,

  1. Harvard University 
    https://online-learning.harvard.edu/catalog/free 
  2. Coursera
    https://www.coursera.org/courses?query=free
  3. edX
    https://www.edx.org/

Be blessed!

PRE-SCHOOLING: THE NEW PARADIGM

The Covid-19 pandemic has necessitated a new way of life for all. The need for change in one of the critical areas is ‘education’.  The effects of coronavirus and the observance of preventive measures announced by the government has changed the entire outlook of the education system, resetting the life of students, parents, and teachers exponentially.

When pandemic started, schools had to shift to online teaching. Many of them have been successful in turning the physical school into virtual school, while some are yet to achieve it for all the grades.

The time spent during the lockdowns & transition to online learning has given parents the direction to adapt and cater to their kids’ learning & development themselves customised with online lessons to the changed scenario.

In India, while the schools are still closed, parents of playschool and preschool going children want to know whether their children’s admission can be postponed by a year or should they be learning online through the classes arranged by the schools. Or just let the children be, not doing anything at all, as far as a formal way of learning goes.

Some parents are hesitant (not wanting to, despite peer pressure) enrolling their children between the age group 2-4 years for online preschool classes as they are not comfortable with the idea of their toddlers spending two-three hours in front of the screens as this being their first time experience and exposure to the formal way of preparing their children. The screen time of many children presently has anyways increased, so to draw children away or to minimize the screen time, some parents feel home teaching is the best way of learning- teaching right now. But one of the big concerns then is, their children are losing the peer group to play and interact with, giving them the important social skills.

For all stakeholders, the safety of children is essential, especially during the time of the pandemic. So, parents and children have options to either choose the new learning environment and make the learning possible through online resources or home school their kids or give the best of both worlds (if possible).

Swati Popat Vats, author and early childhood education expert, says, “Parents need to know that preschool contributes to the foundation of the child. Parents can defer the enrolment into a physical school, but they must not defer the academic year of the kids.  Even if the schools are physically closed, parents are unable to give language stimulations at home, but the brain of the child still needs these invigorations, so parents can defer an academic year, but not the child’s learning.”                                                                                

90% of a child’s brain development happens by the age of five. Children have a natural motivation to learn. Children are curious learners; they like discovering everything around them, and exploring every object under their reach. Just as they learn to stand and walk on their own by trying continually and master their walking, the same goes with learning to read, write, and speak.

Home is the first best place to start the journey of early childhood learning. Parents and teachers can integrate many learning principles in daily life by observing the child’s interest, noticing what they often like exploring & delving into, encouraging their curiosity and guiding appropriately, also setting some ground rules so that they learn to be respectful, can assist in nurturing the child’s uniqueness and, all the while, spending time together with parents.   

Children’s perceptions are built at home; they start learning about objects and things around them with their sense of touch, feel, sight, hear and interaction, to understand and experience the nature of the world. Majority of the activities that children can perform should be physical explorations where they have an assurance that they are safe and have plenty of time.  If children are physically active, they engage mentally fast. No better place than home for this and no better adults than parents to facilitate the learning for a child there can be. Parents can make it possible and provide a well-rounded education to their children with the help of online activity guidance, book kit and preschool material kits.

As a child grows, they start to become explorative, inquisitive and the desire of acing all activities increases. Workbooks and picture books are good companions for a child at this age. In this stage, augmented reality enabled books to deliver interactive content, focused on curriculum-based education are a good resource. With stories, rhymes, alphabets, words, images, storytelling-precisely explained and projected just like physical learning with a teacher, concept building and early childhood learning can be strengthened by parents. Parents get virtual teachers on the pages of the books that provide instant support and guidance on how to teach their children on the particular concept or activity of the book. Hands-on learning also comes with a virtual teacher. This is convenient for the parents to learn the procedure in a few minutes and guide the child to perform the activities correctly.

A good education system always needs an effective, age-wise curriculum that imparts the urge for learning, making it easy and fun-filled. To enhance the child’s ability to apply the knowledge, parents can teach and encourage the activity-based and innovative learning approach. Dr Maria Montessori says “The hands are the instruments of man’s intelligence” and that the hand and brain must develop in harmony. 

For toddler group, aged up to 3 years, lot of well-crafted hands-on training materials are available online; parents can use these training materials to train a few activities such as music and movement, language, arts and crafts, hand-eye coordination. For children, 3 to 6 years, parents can teach languages, phonics, numbers, read bedtime stories, practical life exercises with the help of online materials.  Besides, parents can give their children pretend play items, building blocks, hand-eye coordination materials and many more items that reduce the screen time and keep the child actively involved for a longer duration. Some of our favourites for early structured age-wise educational supplies & programmes are from firstcryintelli kit and flintoclass@home.

Today, homeschooling is also largely accepted by many parents, and they are more comfortable with the alternatives of imparting education to their kids. All thanks to the Internet! The Internet has revolutionized, parents and children can access all the knowledge in the world.  There are some brilliant educational websites for kids like National Geographic kids, STEM works, Exploratorium, how stuff works, science buddies and many more that provide an excellent way for kids to learn.

Children need the right age-related learning resources. Digital resources are available on an easy to navigate portals where parents can teach a child with just a click. Learning resources are set up in a clutter-free form and are available age-wise. As children progress through the curriculum, level-by-level, lessons become challenging, exactly the way it happens in schoolroom learning. This is called adaptive learning.

Online learning helps the parents, teachers and children learn-teach, whether on an aeroplane trip across the country or on a quick ride in the car. Wherever they are, parents can take the preschool with them on the laptop, tablet or even on the smartphone, if required.

Although parents have busy schedules and many both working, they can fine-tune their timings; can swap shifts or work from home, so that one of them can supervise the child when the other is at work. Children’s academic schedule when well-planned in advance, a day prior or weekly or even monthly overview can help in channelling resources in a better way. Also, parents keeping themselves flexible and open to the changes that may come uninvited in the schedules would serve a multitude in maintaining one’s peace and harmony.

Children need holistic development, they must be in a safe and secure environment, and all this can happen harmoniously only if there is genuine understanding, cooperation and support from the family and all participating members in the education of the child.

Happy parenting and happy schooling!