A – Z Gratitude List

A - Z Gratitude List of Pratham

In the A-Z of life, it’s the little things that matter! That’s what Pratham’s gratitude list reminded me of!

The list is evolving ever since we started practicing Gratitude this way, here’s one such list:

Pratham's Gratitude List from A - Z while playing A - Z Gratitude Game

This list would be an ever-evolving one. Some days we are only at A, B, C, D, E, the kids’ attention span as per Psychiatrist Colette Poole- Boykin is not more than ‘Kids age multiplied by 2 or 5 minutes’, the result approximates the amount of time the child can stay focused.

P.S. 1) Most of our list elements would speak more about cars and types of cars which my son owns at home.

2) Words starting with K, Q, U, Y and Z did not come to my son Pratham initially, so I introduced a few words to him and as he is learning phonics and sounds, so introducing new words seems easier for me.

Benefits of ‘A – Z Gratitude Game‘:

  1.  Parents and children, both are practising Gratitude in the company of one another. It helps them in building the bond stronger and also assists them with exercising of the gratitude muscles. Just as physical exercise is important, so is gratitude practices for children and parent both.
  2. This further contributes to enhancing their vocabularies where more words can be introduced to the child in a play-way method.
  3. Early gratitude practices help in Self Discovery & Personal Development of a child. With this, you are also teaching the kids about the sense of organs and body parts.

Thank you!

Fine Motor Skills Development

The creation of a child from a single cell is magical, and so is the development of the complex human brain. But what aids the development of the human brain is rather a series of simple activities. 

The brain controls and facilitates the functioning of the entire body stimuli. So the development of our brain can be seen as a coding process whereby our brain learns various skills over time. One set of such skills is termed as ‘Fine Motor Skills’. Fine motor skills involve fine coordination between small muscles in our hands, wrists, fingers, feet, and toes to act in accordance with what we see. ‘Hand-eye coordination’ is a type of fine motor skills.  

Following are the six integral aspects of Fine Motor Skills:

● Agility
● Balance
● Coordination
● Power
● Reaction Time 
● Speed 

As we have highlighted above, the development of children’s fine motor skills can be boosted by some simple activities which are all about a fun learning experience. So the next time your child is tempted towards screen-time, try involving them in some of these fun activities instead!

Activity 1 – The Pulse Puzzle

The activity might sound like a tongue-twister, but it can be a great pastime activity, that involves absolutely no cost. Pick two distinct coloured pulses, say, the split Bengal gram and green gram, and add in beans like red kidney beans or the white-eyed peas. Mix them together in a bowl and your activity is ready. Now encourage your child to segregate them and put them into different bowls. The activity not only involves the act of picking and holding but also improves the child’s recognition skills with respect to colours and textures, and might even encourage them to eat pulses. Start with two pulses and then you can make your way up from there. 

Activity 2 – Lego

Lego building blocks are children’s absolute favourite (and adults’ too, honestly!). Turning, placing, and flipping the pieces support the development of fine-motor skills. And they also promote creativity and imagination as every Lego play hour is an opportunity to build and talk about something new altogether!

Activity 3 – Craft Fun

Often parents fear giving scissors to their children concerning over the sharp-edges. But now there are a variety of child-safe scissors (safety scissors) available in the market that are kid-friendly. Cutting and pasting activities are a perfect setup to build hand-eye coordination and boost to creativity is a bonus! Also, colouring and painting are great activities too. 

Activity 4 – Threading Beads

Threading beads can be a great activity to promote visual motor-skills. And you can always play around colours and types of beads that encourage children to come up with newer patterns. Also, it enhances children’s detail to attention. You can step-up the activity and play with variations. One such variation can be showing a pattern of threaded beads of different colours and asking your child to replicate the same. Playing around such variations can keep the freshness of the activity intact and boost your child’s retention. 

Little activities like these go a long way and strengthen the foundation of our children’s development. Also, it is important to incorporate these activities as a fun learning experience and not like a to-do-list activity. Our children learn everything at their pace. The ‘right-age’ or the ‘right-pace’ is a myth. Don’t let any of these viral ideas ruin your experience of parenting. 

To read about my parenting experience with my child on his fine motor skills and when it consciously started, go to the link here.

I prefer encouraging what my child is genuinely interested in (mainly Lego brick building) along with free-printable activities I receive from ‘Growing Hands-On Kids’ website by Heather Greutman. 

Happy Parenting!

No Normal

No Normal‘ a new and a startling phrase…

Dr Graeme Codrington in an interview with the ‘Asia Professional Speakers Convention‘ sheds light on what to expect in the near future, as the global Covid-19 pandemic will subdue, leaving the world economy in a reset mode.  

Dr Graeme Codrington is a futurist, digging deeper into scenarios, and analysing trends to anticipate the future, to help us prepare to combat threats and adapt to the changes efficiently. On being asked about how long the pandemic is going to last, basing the answer on historical accounts of previous pandemics, he expects the COVID-19 pandemic to last around 2-3 years after which the community can be expected to build herd immunity. But in the worst-case scenario, it might extend to 5-10 years. 

Rebutting the commonly used phrase ‘the new normal’, he highlights that there will be ‘No Normal’. He highlights that ultimately we will be living with deep disruption affecting all spheres of life and business.

When asked about the impact on the community, especially that of speakers, coaches, and trainers, he brings out the positives of the situation. He highlights how the ‘have to’ situations have made us learn and adapt inevitably. Most of the online services and the usage of advanced technologies should be seen as an enhanced reach that can possibly continue in the future.  The key takeaway from his interview was that the current scenario is all about recognizing all possible choices to extend services online and work upon the technique, style, and content to adapt to the ‘new default setting’ where people would want to avoid physical contact. 

Key Highlights:

  • Complaining about government regulations unless the global Covid-19 pandemic subdues would not be useful. Instead, keeping a positive attitude and a problem-solving approach would serve us. Our choices will ultimately shape us and our environment.
  • Not to panic, just a lot of preparation because there is going to be a change in the way we will now engage with the world around us.
  • Post Covid-19, there would be an exponential rise in the digitisation of businesses fuelling innovations in healthcare, online education, almost all across the board. 
  • Hope is not a strategy. Look at what’s probable and plan accordingly. 
  • The balance between fear and confidence will shape the future of businesses and our community as a whole. 
  • Spend lockdown time not just to enhance technology, but also your style and technique of delivering or imparting knowledge; taking it as an opportunity.

Personal reflections on the New Normal – Part 2

Hello! Here, in this blog, you would get to know me better, my likes and dislikes, and a few uplifting words/phrases for you and me to munch on.

We begin with an acrostic poem which briefs us of the term ‘NEW NORMAL’.

Researchers say that a new activity takes 50 to 70 days to become a habit. In the first 21 days, the brain starts firing a new neural pathway, and the more often we repeat an activity, the more we begin internalizing it as a daily habit.  We did get 50-70 days, over the four phases of the lockdown in India. Let us not break the new healthy habits. New normal after the fourth phase is the time to reflect and see how much we have internalized what we practised during the past four phases.

And now my reflections on what my new normal would be – work-life, habits and routines I’d like to stay with, after having experimented with a mix & match of what felt good to do and what not, especially in the past three months.

Things that I have been practising since 2018 & would continue doing the rest of my life are mediation, gratitude journaling, writing or singing affirmations, practising mindfulness, eating frequent moderate meals.

Below is a list of things which I did for the first time out of nowhere and a few which I carried out more intentionally during the last three months:

  1. I am a person who’d not cook as an everyday chore. I was more in the kitchen at this time around. Many a times trying out new dishes. It actually worked as a therapy for me. I also listened to inspirational Karen Drucker and Tina Turner’s song to add positive vibes to the meal preparation time. Their songs are affirmation based or mantra chants. I’d love to try out new dishes more often in an ethereal way… Below is a collage of a few new food items, I made:



  2. Uncertainties of the time brought me to write more blogs for my website- She Narrates, more than ever before. I would keep at it as my new normal now. You would get to hear more often from me now. I made more posts public during this period. I was also sharing posts on Instagram from shenarrates.in handle more often, either musings or acrostic poems. Earlier I was writing as a hobby only, or I would write and not make posts public because I was somewhere not embracing my vulnerabilities of going public. I am a self-trained-extrovert person trying to shun my introvert nature. It is not natural to me, but I am getting better day by day. Cheers!

  3. I will be working from home until my son’s school reopens in September. Earlier, my son used to stay in day-care when I was out for work. The lockdown period saw me sitting with my son for his virtual classes, and it felt so good. Now, he is attending summer camp, and we are making craft-work memories together. He has made a few car models and contraptions. I’d continue with this practice rather than sitting with him only on weekends.
    Here is a collage of a few activities of my little one:

4. Take a nature walk daily. Be it for 5 minutes or 20 minutes. Observe nature mindfully using all the senses- sights, smells, shapes, textures, sounds. Listening to the birdsongs, watching shapes of clouds and greenery all around is actually uplifting.

5. Exercise at least 30 minutes 6 days a week and swing my body and free dance (Qoya dance) for body flexibility and stamina. I have become a regular with Qoya dance now. Yay!

6. My family and I were eating healthy most of the time. We are choosing to keep at it forever now, with cheat meals once a week maybe!

7. Sanitizing of groceries, washing hands frequently, increasing fluid intakes, wearing a mask whenever I step out of the house, returning to our Namaste culture of greeting people, maintaining a safe hand-distance in public, calling friends and family once a week. Most of these things are indispensable, to live with the new virus and might be followed by all.

8. Changing the look and feel of my workstation helped me look at things with different perspectives – in a positive way, of course. We all had the spikes of fearsome thoughts come and go, isn’t it?

9. I was also switching off the phone two hours before going to bed and check WhatsApp, Facebook and LinkedIn after 10:00 am only- simply to be more present with family and at work. I’d maintain that as well.

10. Panic of grocery buying got me to declutter seriously and more purposefully. I had decluttered the kitchen and made an inventory of necessary things. Still, I could feel the extras of everything in my life. We were in a position to give away the extras to those who needed them.

11. Cosmic Writing was something new for me. I had never done this sort of writing before; this was the first form of journaling activity I picked up to get back to writing. I gave myself a 21-days challenge for this as a beginning for my writing spirit. I have discussed this in a separate blog. Coming up here.

Things that I would like to cut down on or eliminate are:

  1. Eating outside every Sunday: This had become our Sundays’ ritual. My family is cutting down on this purposely.
  2. Junk foods: We are considering less-junk and canned foods. We may keep cheat meals; otherwise, it would be like going too harsh at one go.
  3. Social media: Cut back on social media time and frequency of visits. Use social media more purposely.
  4. Screen time: less screen time, less watching TV for all.
  5. News: I’d refrain from watching the news all the time.

Uplifting Phrases or Words that kept me going are:

  1. Treating the quarantine period as the ‘Gift of time’,
  2. Taking the ‘leap of faith’,
  3. Reviving of the new (Reawakening),
  4. The word ‘discipline’ changed to ‘orchestration‘ for me,
  5. Slowing down helps in increasing the number of productive hours, and it was much relatable at this time for me.

I hope the above reflections may help you in making your list. Please feel free to share which new habits would you like to keep, in the comment section below.

Thank you! Stay happy, calm and healthy!